To Be or Not to Be

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The words “to be or not to be” are arguably the most famous words in the English language. They come from the lips of Shakespeare’s nihilistic protagonist, Hamlet, the prince of Denmark, whose father has been murdered by his mother’s lover. His soul, his very being is traumatized, so much so that reality, his humanity […] Read more »

Of Holy Week and Holy Walks

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Our liturgy is at the heart of who we are. While teaching and preaching in the church inform our minds, liturgy informs our souls. One of the first things we say about the Episcopal church, and particularly All Saints, beyond being welcoming and inclusive, beyond being a “thinking” church, is that we are a church […] Read more »

Of New Insight

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It seems that the only time I go home to Dothan is for funerals. Several weeks ago I went home for the funeral of a dear friend who died young-ish. It is always remarkable to me the paradox: how things change and how they stay the same. My mother is much older and I notice […] Read more »

Of Ends and Beginnings

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I saw on Facebook just the other day a picture of a man holding a cardboard placard with the words, “Prepare, the beginning is near.” This was obviously a take-off on the classic cartoon of the premillennialist prophet standing on the street corner proclaiming that the end is near. Premillennialism infects modern western Christianity. It […] Read more »

For All the Saints, Possibly

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Last Sunday was the feast of All Saints. It is the day when we name our dead, and celebrate their lives. It is the feast day in the church for which we, All Saints, are named. Our new bishop was also here to confirm and receive people who have reaffirmed their faith, people who have […] Read more »